From Literature

social critiques and creative works.

Black Women Are Teachers

Becoming a teacher saved my life. I began my teaching career one month after the passing of my father. I’d spent the summer grieving – laying in bed sad and lost – navigating the path of who I was now that he was gone. On the first day of school, I sat nervously behind my desk – and watched as a gaggle of bright faced Black students walked into my classroom. Ahmad, Caleb, and Dalyn shook hands and found pleasure in having class together. Taryn entered, long legged with a mouth full of braces. Then Shaheem, loud and prepared for…

BLP in Chicago

I am so excited to be facilitating a workshop about the art of writing about love and identity politics. If you’re in the Chicago area, please come see me! This workshop will occur during the 2017 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitationals (CUPSI), so come check out all of the amazing teams competing, particularly Tulane (me being their coach bears no bias.) 

On Super Sunday and Mardi Gras Indians

     (press play)     I’m havin’ my fun on the Mardi Gras Day Mardi Gras, for many, means a chance to travel to New Orleans and indulge in a certain kind of debauchery that is generally frowned upon in the rest of the world. There is something exciting  to tourists about being able to drink alcohol openly and wander down infamous Bourbon Street. When we look at Mardi Gras historically, there is a blatant foundation of racism and classism. You see this in the high membership fees for parading krewes and veiled white men who often selectively (see racially-selective), throw…

Did Ya Miss Me?

We’re back! Black Love Project has evolved into a cultural institute dedicated to preserving the legacy of the music and history of black people. We do so by focusing on love, music and history. Come with as we continue our exploration of the African Diaspora. 

with love: an open letter from your token black friend

  hey, It’s me Monique, your token black friend.  Do you remember me? It’s been a while since we’ve spoken, you’ve become eerily silent since the murders of Rekia Boyd, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Alton Sterling – I could go on but I won’t bore you with semantics. You do sometimes like my posts about…

love poems: hairy legs

when a white feminist cries how many black women will she ask to hand her a tissue? three two to hold the box and one to wipe her tears when being privileged gets too hard for her how many of them will come to you for comfort? two and how many times, black woman will…

Love Poems: Tilted Crown on Write About Now (Live)

  From August 1-5, I traveled home to Atlanta to compete at the National Poetry Slam as a member of Eclectic Truth National Team, Baton Rouge. Amir Safi, Chibbi Orduña and Christopher Diaz of Write About Now were gracious enough to host an after hours cypher. More than 40 poets performed and yours truly was one of them. Check it out!

Natty Dread: On Jamaican History and Hair Identity

  Children get your culture/And don’t stand there and just stare/Or the battle will be harder – Natty Dread As a black person it is radical to love yourself. To be black and proud, to some, means that you are angry or uppity or a threat. In a post-colonial world (using this term lightly), the Diaspora is…

Chay Chay Poley: A Quick Lesson on Liberian English

Song: Chay Chay Poley Artist: Tokay Tomah The linguistics of the Diaspora is fascinating to me. No matter where we landed or remained, our tongues have been influenced by colonization. West Africa is known for its various forms of Pidgin or broken English, the West Indies for their patois and the United States for AAVE.…

Love Is: Dialogue with the African Diaspora

  Three years ago, I began collecting interviews of Black people, questioning their definition of love and discussing other issues related to their personal Black narrative. I started by asking friends (thanks to you BUGA), strangers and musicians, including Big Sant and 9th Wonder. Each interview, each personal narrative proved that Black is not a…